Actualizar Debian 7 Wheezy a Debian 8 Jessie

Categorías:Linux Etiquetas: ,

Saving Iptables Firewall Rules Permanently

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-implement-a-basic-firewall-template-with-iptables-on-ubuntu-14-04

https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-set-up-a-firewall-using-iptables-on-ubuntu-14-04

https://www.thomas-krenn.com/en/wiki/Saving_Iptables_Firewall_Rules_Permanently

iptables-save

The actual iptables rules are created and customized on the command line with the command iptables for IPv4 and ip6tables for IPv6.

These can be saved in a file with the command iptables-save for IPv4.

Debian/Ubuntu: iptables-save > /etc/iptables/rules.v4
RHEL/CentOS: iptables-save > /etc/sysconfig/iptables

These files can be loaded again with the command iptables-restore for IPv4.

Debian/Ubuntu: iptables-restore < /etc/iptables/rules.v4
RHEL/CentOS: iptables-restore < /etc/sysconfig/iptables

If you would also like to use IPv6 rules, these can be stored in a separate file.

Debian/Ubuntu: ip6tables-save > /etc/iptables/rules.v6
RHEL/CentOS: ip6tables-save > /etc/sysconfig/ip6tables

The automatic loading of the configured iptables rules can be done by using the following methods:

iptables-persistent for Debian/Ubuntu

Since Ubuntu 10.04 LTS (Lucid) and Debian 6.0 (Squeeze) there is a package with the name “iptables-persistent” which takes over the automatic loading of the saved iptables rules. To do this, the rules must be saved in the file /etc/iptables/rules.v4 for IPv4 and /etc/iptables/rules.v6 for IPv6.

For use, the package must simply be installed.

apt-get install iptables-persistent

If the installation fails, please check whether systemd has already had failures before the installation of iptables-persisent. Those systemd errors can cause the iptables-persistent installation to fail.[1]

Older iptables-persistent versions (e.g. like those in Debian Squeeze) still do not support IPv6 rules. There is only one file with the name /etc/iptables/rules for IPv4. Check the Init-Script for which files are loaded in your iptables-persistent version.

Please check that your rules are loaded as desired following the first reboot after configuration.

iptables Service for RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and CentOS

RHEL/CentOS also offer simple methods to permanently save iptables rules for IPv4 and IPv6.

There is a service called “iptables”. This must be enabled.

# chkconfig --list | grep iptables
  iptables       	0:off	1:off	2:on	3:on	4:on	5:on	6:off
# chkconfig iptables on

The rules are saved in the file /etc/sysconfig/iptables for IPv4 and in the file /etc/sysconfig/ip6tables for IPv6. You may also use the init script in order to save the current rules.

# service iptables sabe

 

Categorías:Firewall, Linux Etiquetas: , , ,

Chequeo Mail Server

DU Command / Comando DU

 

https://ss64.com/bash/du.html

du  /home/user 
du -h /home/user   "Human Readable" Gigas
du -H /home/user   "Human Readable" Megas
du -sh /home/user  "Short Info + Human Readable"
du -S /home/user   "Separate Dirs"
du -h --max-depth=3 /home/user "Show only 3 level"

 

How to Remove/Uninstall (Oracle Java & openJDK) on Linux

Categorías:Java, Linux Etiquetas: , , , ,

A BETTER BACKUP WITH POSTGRESQL USING PG_DUMP

Easy way to view postgresql dump files

If the dump is not plain text – try using pg_restore -l your_db_dump.file command. It will list all objects in the database dump (like tables, indexes …).

Another possible way (may not work, haven’t tried it) is to grep through the output of pg_restore your_db_dump.file command. If I understood correctly the manual – the output of pg_restore is just a sequence of SQL queries, that will rebuild the db.

Categorías:BBDD, postgresql, Uncategorized